Dairy Farms and Open Space

smcternan April 7th, 2014, 8:10 AM
Sandra McTernan, MSN, Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist
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I recently spent a wonderful,  sunny and warm weekend in Pennsylvania, where I happily noticed sooo much green. After such a long winter with everything covered in white it was nice to see, hear and smell all that spring is.

Southeastern Pennsylvania has so many farmlands that it seems to roll on forever. I love this kind of countryside and know that there are many children and adults who never leave their communities to experience it. Here in the city, there are many things that are beautiful, but rolling pastures and grazing…

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It’s Snowing…..

smcternan February 16th, 2014, 11:49 AM
Sandra McTernan, MSN, Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist
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stowe-holiday-spring 015

Another  day of school at home, and a day at home doing what? Well most kids are not complaining about not going to school, but I can safely say that my kids have caught up (sufficiently) on deprived sleep.

We have also shoveled and dug out from snow bound homes, apartments and cars many times over now. Shoveling is hard work, and it is not the type of work that gets you in shape. Shoveling stresses your back more than anything.

On the other hand, snow forts and snow people and snowball fights…

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Bridging the Generations: A Winning Strategy for Family Caregivers

jsantamaria January 29th, 2014, 5:02 PM
Judy Santamaria, MSPH
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We often refer to the difficulties faced by the “sandwich generation” — those in their 40s and 50s who find themselves caring for elderly family members while they still have children at home. Worrying about driving your elderly mom to the doctor can be especially stressful when you also need to cook a healthy meal for your growing teen. But sandwiched caregivers, take heart: While no one can diminish the stresses you face in caring for both older and younger family members, this may be an opportunity for multiple generations…

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Seniors Have Roomies, Too.

jsantamaria January 17th, 2014, 8:33 AM
Judy Santamaria, MSPH
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roommatesHave you ever considered combating loneliness by sharing your living space with someone else?  Brain studies prove that the more social we are, the longer we live—and the better quality of life we enjoy.  In one study, researchers at Harvard Medical School followed nearly 45,000 people who had heart disease or were at high risk of developing it. The four-year study found that those who lived alone were more likely to die from heart attack, stroke or other heart-related problems than those who lived with others.

Many seniors live alone after divorce or…

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Become a Donor

smcternan January 12th, 2014, 9:22 PM
Sandra McTernan, MSN, Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist
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As New Years’ resolutions go most have settled into working out, more family time, eating healthy and balancing work and life better. But for those of you who may not have chosen or even consider doing anything new with the New Year I urge you to consider becoming an organ donor. Why? Well for one thing there are so many awaiting organs, estimates are that about 15,000 people die per year that would make perfect donors had they consented to donation. For every person who donates there are multiple recipients…

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Hot Weather Safety: Six Essential Tips

jjue July 19th, 2013, 12:37 PM
Jeffrey Jue, PT, Rehabilitation Consultant
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egypt-21157_1280[1]Rising summer temperatures are not only a source of discomfort but can cause heat related illnesses especially in the elderly. Before you head outdoors stay safe by following these essential safety precautions.

1) Check the latest local heat advisories

2) Avoid walking between 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. — generally the hottest time of the day

3) Begin your daily walk at a slow pace to prevent exhaustion and retreat to a cool place if you start to feel uncomfortable

4) Wear light colored and loose fitting clothing

5) Drink plenty of non-alcoholic fluids to stay adequately hydrated and pack…

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Rheumatoid Arthritis: Easy Cooking Tips

jjue March 27th, 2013, 9:19 PM
Jeffrey Jue, PT, Rehabilitation Consultant
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MealThose living with Rheumatoid Arthritis often have difficulty with daily activities and cooking is no exception. This chronic condition causes inflammation at the joints and surrounding tissues. This can affect your ability to use a cutting board, open jars, carry pots and stand for long periods of time.

But by using certain kitchen tools and modifying your kitchen environment, you can decrease the amount of stress placed on your joints. If you or a loved has Rheumatoid Arthritis, follow these tips to make cooking easier.

Use Adaptive Kitchen Tools

  • Speed up and reduce prep work with a food processor
  • Decrease…
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Angelic Sleeping Babies

smcternan December 3rd, 2012, 3:31 PM
Sandra McTernan, MSN, Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist
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baby-sleeping

by Peter Griffin

Nurses who visit people in their homes are sometimes the only way that patients receive health information and learn prevention strategies that can improve their overall health. Sometimes, the patients can be challenging, but for nurses, perseverance pays.

One such example involved a young mom of a premature infant. The mom had a history of feeding difficulty and was on some medications. Mom wanted to breastfeed but refused to pump and measure volume. What to do when trying to explain this to the mom was getting difficult? Teaching is a big part of what…

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A Day in the Life of Jennifer Morales: Part 5

stav November 27th, 2012, 12:54 PM
Stav Birnbaum
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francesca1Jennifer’s final stop for the morning was to visit a long-term patient who has Neuromyolitis Optica (NMO), a degenerative disorder that is similar to multiple sclerosis but it attacks the spine rather than the brain. Patients diagnosed with NMO usually live no more than 5 years after diagnosis, and Francesca P. was diagnosed five years ago. The disease has taken its toll. She’s now blind in both eyes and is a quadriplegic. Additionally, she developed two pressure ulcers as a result of chemotherapy treatment – part of the treatment regimen for the disease.…

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In the Aftermath of a Storm

smcternan November 26th, 2012, 1:57 PM
Sandra McTernan, MSN, Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist
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IMG_3137It will soon be a month of living in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy. Many people in our area are still trying to recover, and many are just at the beginning, having lost everything. In the event of a major catastrophe, children often watch quietly as their world changes. A few kids may express their fears and concerns, but some will never openly discuss what they are feeling. As parents, it is very important to keep lines of communication open and provide your children with a loving home, whether or not you are displaced.

Post 9/11…

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