Giving it Their Best

guest April 8th, 2014, 12:35 PM
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The Threshold Choir. Sue Ribaudo is in the middle of the back row, in the blue shirt.

The Threshold Choir. Sue Ribaudo is in the middle of the back row, in the blue shirt.

April 6-12 is National Volunteer Week, and this marks the 40th year of recognizing the people who give their time and their talents to our organization and our communities.  This week is about inspiring, recognizing and encouraging people to seek out imaginative ways to engage in their communities. A Day in the Life talked to two of VNSNY’s amazing volunteers.

Sue Ribaudo is the Music Director of the New York City chapter of the Threshold…

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Dairy Farms and Open Space

smcternan April 7th, 2014, 8:10 AM
Sandra McTernan, MSN, Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist
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I recently spent a wonderful,  sunny and warm weekend in Pennsylvania, where I happily noticed sooo much green. After such a long winter with everything covered in white it was nice to see, hear and smell all that spring is.

Southeastern Pennsylvania has so many farmlands that it seems to roll on forever. I love this kind of countryside and know that there are many children and adults who never leave their communities to experience it. Here in the city, there are many things that are beautiful, but rolling pastures and grazing…

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Autism and Recent Findings

smcternan March 31st, 2014, 11:18 AM
Sandra McTernan, MSN, Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist
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Two new reports have been released about the rise in autism incidence in this country. What does it all mean really? We do know that autism is no longer rare, and that it no longer affects only, or even primarily, boys. The incidence is rising in both boys and girls, albeit more boys than girls are still diagnosed.

We can identify autism at much younger ages using tools that ascertain symptoms that would otherwise be missed at a child’s 6-, 12-, 18-month and two-year check-ups. We are getting better at getting services to…

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A Cough That Just Won’t Stop

smcternan March 23rd, 2014, 4:53 PM
Sandra McTernan, MSN, Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist
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Maybe spring is in the air, but along with warmer temperatures come a host of viruses and bacteria as you venture outdoors.

Have you ever had a cold that lasts for two weeks or longer and then becomes an irritating, compulsive cough? This may actually be whooping cough. Whooping cough can be deadly in small children and infants as it becomes very difficult to eat, and vomiting and difficulty breathing are often symptoms of whooping cough. It is very hard to watch a child cough repeatedly and struggle to breathe. Malaise…

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Q&A: A Conversation with a Long-Distance, Long-Time Caregiver

guest March 21st, 2014, 10:53 AM
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lisahirschandmomA Day in the Life spoke with Lisa Hirsch, author of My Mom My Hero: Alzheimer’s—A mother and daughter’s bittersweet journey, creator of the My Mom My Hero blog, and long-distance caregiver of her mother Ruth, who has Alzheimer’s.

Your mom was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s more than nine years ago. How has your relationship with your mom changed?
Oh, it’s changed completely. I just fell deeply in love with my mother. She inspires me. Before her illness we spoke maybe once a week. Since her illness, I’ve spoken to her nearly every single…

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Move It, Move It

smcternan March 16th, 2014, 1:00 PM
Sandra McTernan, MSN, Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist
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Upon my return from a national conference on all things Pediatrics and Healthcare, an interesting discussion was ignited by Bone Health and the loss of bone density in children. Why are children today experiencing more bone breakage and weaker bones? Does the use of sunscreen have anything to do with it? Maybe,but then again maybe not as skin cancer is also on the rise in younger and younger children. What is a parent to do about their child’s bone health. Well it is known that kids that are active have…

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VNSNY and Women’s History Month

stav March 14th, 2014, 8:40 AM
Stav Birnbaum
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March has been a big month for VSNY on Facebook. It’s Women’s History Month and we celebrated our founder, Lillian Wald’s 147th birthday on March 10th. Here are our top three posts:

Which post if your favorite?

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National Nutrition Month: Deciphering Food Labels

margeryk March 11th, 2014, 12:08 PM
Margery Kirsch, MS, RN, CDE, BC-ADM, Clinical Nurse Specialist and Diabetes Educator
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128px-US_Nutritional_Fact_Label.svgMarch is National Nutrition Month. Have you ever wondered what the difference is between fat-free, saturated fat-free, low-fat, reduced and less fat? Certain nutrition claims used on food packaging have been legally defined. For example, you’ll see the claim “less sodium” on some brands of chili with beans. This means the product has at least 25% less sodium than the regular version.

It’s important to pay attention to serving sizes. The next time you grab a handful of “fat-free” pretzels for a snack, measure or count the amount. If it’s considerably…

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Powered by Treadmill

smcternan March 2nd, 2014, 5:34 PM
Sandra McTernan, MSN, Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist
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Recently I read an interesting article about activity levels in different ages of children and adults. Apparently we do little exercise even though we ALL know it is good for us in many ways. Research shows preschool children tend to do better at sit down activities that require focused attention if they have the opportunity to move and exercise in-between focused activities. Have you ever noticed that if you walk on a nice day you feel refreshed and focused on your return to your desk. Most preventative health practices encourage…

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Peace on …Trains, Planes and Automobiles

smcternan February 23rd, 2014, 3:18 PM
Sandra McTernan, MSN, Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist
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Thirty percent of two-year-olds (yes, toddlers!) know how to operate a smart phone. As plans go forward to allow use of cellular phones on planes, I wonder who will use phones more, adults or their offspring. I am guilty of handing my iPhone to my elementary school child as we wait to board a plane or for a meal served in a restaurant to prevent boredom,  but actually I have realized that the opportunity to distract my child with another tactic is lost. With my older children, I’d have a…

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